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Old 28th September 2008, 01:44   #1
Mike Peters
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Default " RUPERT " The Paradummy, WW2 Decoy Paratrooper

Everyone should have a Rupert -- He never complains, doesn't eat much and is GREAT with the local Kids !! I never really thought I'd find one but , 2 years ago .. I GOT HIM !! He's in great condition with the original chute still packed up.
Here's some info about "Rupert" (for those who've never met him)--
The British carried out the most famous of all paradummy missions during the early hours of D-Day June 5/6th, 1944. The paradummy operation was code-named "Titanic" and involved dropping hundreds of paradummies along the French coast to confuse and deceive the Germans as to where the actual Allied Airborne drops would occur.
Six brave SAS men jumped along with the paradummies to make a lot of noise on the ground, play combat recordings, make small attacks on German troops (like couriers) and generally help make the landings appear real to the Germans. The SAS men were Lt. Fowles, TPR. Hurst, TPR. Merryweather, Lt. Poole, TPR. Dawson, and TPR. Saunders. Days after the operation only two of these six men had returned to friendly lines. The other five were likely killed or captured but it is possible some survived so this web site is still trying to research their exact fate. Titanic is surely one of the best kept secrets of WWII involving sheer bravery amongst Allied Special Operations soldiers, out there on their own behind enemy lines.
The Titanic operation worked well and actually caused a good number of German troops to spread out away from the real landing areas, and also caused much confusion and doubt amongst German commanders who were then completely unsure if there was in fact an attack happening or not. Titanic is credited with surely reducing many Allied casualties as a result.
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION:
There are many surviving examples of original British D-Day paradummies so physical details are available. These dummies, which have come to be known as "Ruperts" (as opposed to the American "Oscars") were made of simple stuffed burlap sack cloth. They were filled with sand, straw, or wood shavings and were attached to small scale sized parachutes. They were small, only about 3 feet tall, and could be dressed in actual small uniforms.
A few original D-Day Ruperts, which were actually dropped during Operation Titanic, can be found these days in war museums in the U.S. and in Europe and in the hands of a few lucky private collectors. There was also several left over vintage crates of these paradummies found in storage at an old English airfield in the 1980's. These unissued, mint condition original Rupert paradummies, are often found at collector's shows and auction web sites. They are originals from the era, but were never actually dropped during the war.
http://home.att.net/~1.elliott/parat...storysite.html

There's an extra flap sewn in near each end so once you fill his Arms and Legs with sand , you turn down the flap and then tie the rope ..the flap holds the sand in place
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Rupert1.jpg (23.8 KB, 20 views)
File Type: jpg Rupert2.jpg (24.4 KB, 19 views)
File Type: jpg Rupert3.jpg (27.9 KB, 18 views)
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Old 28th September 2008, 02:05   #2
MRomanych
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Meine Gott! Gummi-puppen!
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Old 28th September 2008, 02:40   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MRomanych View Post
Meine Gott! Gummi-puppen!
more like -- "Canvas-Puppen"

I rarely see them here in the US ...do they still show up at shows in the UK ?
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Old 28th September 2008, 02:43   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MRomanych View Post
Meine Gott! Gummi-puppen!
Come to think of it there MR ...at least they didn't use "Blow-Up" Dolls , would have been kinda hard to explain in today's society
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Old 28th September 2008, 08:40   #5
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Hi Mike, they are extreamly rare and hardly ever come up for sale here in the UK.

Your link is not working BTW. But I suspect it will be this one, which I have in my faves list:

http://home.att.net/~1.elliott/parat...storysite.html

Thanks for showing yours.

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Old 28th September 2008, 11:26   #6
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Re: "Gummi-puppen." I was loosely quoting the scene in the movie "The Longest Day" where the reports of the decoy paratroopers go up the German chain of command with each officer exclaiming "Gummi-puppen?" It is funny to watch and always gets my wife - a former XVIII Airborne Corps paratrooper and jumpmaster - to laugh wildly no matter how many times we see it - typically every June. The other great line is at the end of the movie when Richard Burton, a downed and dying RAF pilot tells a young American paratrooper that he is "Dying for a cigarette." A flawed but good movie.
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Old 28th September 2008, 14:30   #7
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Hi MR ..Yup ..it is an entertaining movie and they invested more money into making it than their research. And you're right ..many people today still think they were all made of Rubber ...many don't know "Rupert" existed. What confused things was how the WW2 American “Paradummy” was actually made out of Rubber (but , he was named Oscar) .
QUOTE--
“As a result of this test, the US Navy at Lakehurst developed larger, inflatable dummies made of rubberized material, the so-called PD-Packs. The PD-Packs were used in southern France and the Philippines.
Another use of artificial Paratroopers by Americans in the Second World War took place over New Guinea during a jump of the 503d Infantry Regiment. It is believed these were the rubber dummies. In the 1950s, the US Army further developed the "Oscar" paradummy variation. This development led to an easy-to-transport, foldable dummy whose head and boots were made of plaster. The dummies now also wore realistic fabric uniforms. The new type was used during missions in Korea."

"This is a reproduction Decoy Paratrooper Dummy called the "PD-Pack". This reproduction was created using the exact specifications of the original dummies. It was made and donated to the museum decades after the war by some of the men who had helped manufacture the original PD Pack paradummies during WWII. It was made of rubberized material and was inflated by the attached CO2 Bottle, then upon landing it was destroyed by the attached TNT block, leaving only the parachute behind - suggesting a real paratrooper had landed. Military records show that the PD Pack paradummies were used in August of 1944, during Operation Anvil-Dragoon in Southern France. It is believed they were used again later in the war in the South Pacific. A different type of paradummy, made of sack cloth and filled with straw, was used on D-Day, June 6th, 1944 during Operation Titanic. Titanic involved six British S.A.S. soldiers who parachuted into France on June5/6 along with dozens of sack cloth paradummies, to confuse and divert German forces away from the actual Allied Airborne landings. Photo is from the Airborne Museum in St. Mere Eglise - France. 2006. /PAJ"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:PD-Pack-01-800.jpg
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File Type: jpg Oscar.jpg (84.1 KB, 8 views)

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Old 28th September 2008, 14:30   #8
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I have seen these before, but only one old newsreel footage and never before at a show.

Excellent, Mike

Raymond
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Old 28th September 2008, 14:32   #9
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Of course "Hollywood" didn't like how "Oscar" looked so ...they made their own version --
This is a "movie prop" paradummy which was created in the 1960's for the famous war film called "The Longest Day." These highly detailed rubber dummies are often mistaken for real WWII paradummies, however, they do not look anything like the real WWII paradummies. From the Airborne museum in St. Mere Eglise - France.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Oscar-01-500.jpg
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